A very spoonie-fied blog

I’m sorry I’ve been absent for a while – well, almost a month now. There is no real excuse, especially when I know how writing helps me, but I just haven’t had the urge to write, I’ve had a slump and I thought that rather than force out blog posts that I didn’t really believe in, I’d stop. Pause. Take stock and tell myself it’s okay to take a break and come back as and when it felt right.

I am disappointed in myself that the month of May has been the time for this period of nothingness because it’s an important month for ME/CFS. May is ME awareness month as well as awareness for many other hidden illnesses. I’ve watched and followed eagerly how my little spoonie online community have raised awareness and done so much for the cause. Next year I will do more but for this year, all I can offer is this blog post.

I’ll start with a little fun fact; May 12th was Florence Nightingales birthday and it is suggested that she was one of the earliest sufferers of ME.  From 1857 she was often disabled by ill-health and spent much of her time bed bound; she is now considered a kind of patron saint for this under studied illness and this is why May 12th is used as a day for awareness. How about that eh?!

I then thought I would recap the main facts about ME, so I have used the main websites that I find useful and informative to provide you with the following:

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) provides three levels of severity for ME: mild, moderate and severe. This is how they explain them:

  • People with mild CFS/M.E. are mobile, can care for themselves and can do light domestic tasks with difficulty. Most are still working or in education, but to do this they have probably stopped all leisure and social pursuits. They often take days off, or use the weekend to cope with the rest of the week.
  • People with moderate CFS/M.E. have reduced mobility and are restricted in all activities of daily living, although they may have peaks and troughs in their level of symptoms and ability to do activities. They have usually stopped work, school or college and need rest periods, often sleeping in the afternoon for one or two hours. Their sleep at night is generally poor quality and disturbed.
  • People with severe CFS/M.E. are unable to do any activity for themselves, or can carry out minimal daily tasks only (such as face washing, cleaning teeth). They have severe cognitive difficulties and depend on a wheelchair for mobility. They are often unable to leave the house, or have a severe and prolonged after-effect if they do so. They may also spend most of their time in bed, and are often extremely sensitive to light and noise.

I come under moderate. I won’t go on about my personal experience because I feel I’ve done that enough in previous blogs. However, progress has been made in that the 4-6 month wait for CBT has been destroyed and I have already had my first two sessions. Now, I know there is much debate about the usefulness and effectiveness of CBT for ME patients and I must admit, initially I was wary. But you know what? This is the only thing, the only offer of help I’ve had from the NHS so I am grasping it with both hands. I’ve gone into it with an open mind but also with open eyes. Luckily I made an immediate connection with the therapist and I trust her – both a bonus when you consider all the bad luck I’ve had over the past 20 months! We have set targets together to try to help me with my sleep – not working yet and as she predicted have made things worse before they hopefully get better. I like her because she is honest. There’s no BS, it might work for me, it might not but with everything crossed it could improve on what I live with daily and that’s enough for me thank you very much!

  • ME is a chronic illness which means it is long-lasting with no cure or guaranteed treatment.
  • ME is a physical disorder – having ME is NOT a state of mind and there is real scientific proof for this.

Life with ME has made me reevaluate everything about myself and my life, I guess a life changing illness will do that to you. It’s a terribly lonely illness. Yes I am surrounded daily by my wonderful family and I have constant contact with friends but I don’t have that connection with people anymore. I don’t have work banter, I don’t have social banter or random chats with people you may see when you’re simply out and about. I spend A LOT of time alone, sleeping, thinking…and that is lonely. It’s isolating and it makes daily life tough to face.

Raising awareness of illnesses like ME is so very important. Even doctors don’t know very much about them and patients – including me – often have to educate their GPs and specialists about possible medications, treatments and symptoms. It’s a frustrating situation that can be made easier by more people being educated and therefore having an understanding of what sufferers are living with on a daily basis.

Thank you for reading, thank you for baring with me and thank you for your continued support.

Have a lovely weekend.

#hairlesshannah

 

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3 thoughts on “A very spoonie-fied blog

    • Thank you so much! Taking my time and not putting pressure on myself to write…I enjoyed blogging again though so hopefully I’ll get back to frequently blogging again! Means a lot that you follow 😘

      Like

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