I, Hannah Green

Last week I finally got round to watching, ‘I, Daniel Blake.’ From the opening second I could feel my heart beating faster and stress filtering through my body – the scene was one of a conversation between Daniel and the DWP (Department for Work and Pensions) asking the medical assessment questions. Questions which will lead to you being awarded points which then determine what benefits you are entitled to. It is scored out of 15 and the questions go something like this: “Can you lift your arm above your head? Can you walk unaided for 50 metres? Can you walk to the bottom of your garden unaided? Can you show me how you take your shoes and socks off? Can you empty your bowels frequently?

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Yes, these questions and answers override anything your doctors or specialists have advised or done and if you score less than the 15 points they tell you that you are fit for work and therefore need to apply for Job Seekers Allowance. I cannot tell you how similar Daniel’s story is to mine. I scored 0/15 on my assessment. Zero. Zilch.Nada. So as with Daniel, I had my ESA (Employment Support Allowance) taken away – which I’d never actually received in the first place may I add – and was told to make an appointment for Job Seekers.

The character of Daniel is similar to myself. He didn’t want to give up without a fight because he knew he was entitled to something and that is what we have worked and contributed for all our lives. In the end I cancelled my Job Seekers interview after yet another frustrating conversation with the DWP. I tried telling them that although I was wanting to take my case for mandatory consideration, I was not willing to waste both my own and the people at Job Seekers when I wasn’t actually able to work! This they couldn’t understand. They wanted me to turn up and get advise on how to write a CV before applying – at this point I informed her I was a teacher and knew how to write a CV, again I was told, “In order to dispute your claim Miss Green, this is what we will need to see you doing.” Well I’m sorry, but I am not doing that, I am not willing to put myself through a humiliating session, being made to feel degraded and useless. So the route I am taking is to let the DWP know that my parents will be appealing on my behalf because I no longer have the strength to deal with their red tape and bs.

I won’t give away the whole storyline of the film, but you should watch it. It challenges stereotypes at every turn and gives an insight into how people could quite easily end up homeless on the streets. If I didn’t have my family or the back up of selling my flat, what would I do then? The reality is that once my money was gone, I would be homeless. I am sure the people at the DWP are nice people who are just doing as they are told but to me they are inhumane robots who don’t care, don’t see the real people, don’t consider what medical professionals are saying about your health. They talk to you like you are below them, like a piece of dog poo they stepped in on the street, they let you hang up the phone and cry because you feel so worthless. I wonder what they would do or how they would feel in the same situation?

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There is something fundamentally wrong with our society and our benefits system. I would give anything to be able to work, if I could I’d be down applying for Job Seekers ASAP but I can’t right now and regardless of what my GP, neurologist and ME specialists say, the computer still says no because I can lift my arms high enough to put a hat on my head! I know that the majority of people on benefits do genuinely need them, but I also know there are people out there who abuse the system and get away with it and that angers me beyond belief. All I want is to receive the benefits I’m entitled to so that I can help my parents pay the bills that I’m adding to by being back at home. I want to have some money coming in so I don’t feel totally dependent. I want to be acknowledged as someone who is worth the help and support, not someone who is a scrounger.

I, Daniel Blake is a very powerful film which highlights current issues in a true light, and I can say that because much of what he experiences mirrors what I have to. I have a very dear friend who is also having to fight for her sons rights, if you heard the details of their story your blood would boil on their behalf. The film should be watched by as many people as possible so that these issues are discussed – awareness can only bring positive outcomes. So watch, talk about it and take action if you feel you can. Our next step will be writing to our local MP, the injustice needs to be addressed.

I, Hannah Green feel abused by the system, but I’m afraid that as with Daniel in the film, they have chosen the wrong person and family. We will continue to fight and complain and make my voice heard..I just need to stock up on some spoons before I try again!

Just something for you to ponder on this Tuesday!

See you Friday.

#hairlesshannah