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Happiness is….

What does happiness mean to you? Has your definition changed over the years?

I was with a friend at the weekend and we got to reminiscing about our school days and talking about what our old class mates were up to now (obviously we only know most of this via Facebook!). We talked about who was married and had children, who had what job and achieved certain things and then my friend said something that struck a chord – when we bump into people from our past, we ask them all these questions about their jobs, families etc but one question that is never asked is – are you happy? Because, as we know, we can edit our lives into the perfect picture of happiness for social media but we never truly know the ins and outs of what the true picture is.

It’s something I have never stood back and asked myself at any point in my life I don’t think. When I was in my late teens and early twenties I had a vision of what ‘happy’ looked like, but that wasn’t for then and there, it was always linked to my future. Moving into my own home, getting married, having children, going on adventurous holidays – all big dreams, big ideals of what happy was going to look like in my life. Now, I don’t dispute for one minute that these things do bring happiness, however, I spent so much time focussing on what my ideal, happy, future looked like, I am almost certain I lost sight of the little things that were happening day-to-day that brought me happiness.

Grand plans are a good thing and of course they bring with them happiness but I do think that sometimes, in striving for them the happiness gets forgotten. All these big things take time and planning and often involve stress and rather than embracing it and reminding ourselves – I’ve just bought a house or I’m planning my wedding, we think about the cost, the time, the little irritating bits and pieces that happen along the way and we focus on them rather than the big picture. We are all prone to it, I am too but I guess I am now more tuned in to the fact that we shouldn’t take these moments for granted. Yes we should have a moan and feel overwhelmed by the big bits but then we need to step back and think, wow I’m so lucky, I’ve worked really hard to achieve XYZ and I should be enjoying this!

I guess this realisation comes as you get older. And sometimes you only get this jolt of reality when something life changing happens to you. Because now, I can’t necessarily plan day-to-day let alone plan for the big chunks of happiness and therefore I find myself taking note of the smaller things, day to day that make me happy. In January, my cousin suggested that every night before we went to sleep, we should write in our phones something from the day that made us happy, no matter how small and then at the end of each month we would swap and read each other happiness diaries. It is so interesting to look back over the past ten months and see the things that have made both of us happy – family and friends feature highly, almost every day this is what we have written about. Not material things or planning for what is coming up. The here and now. Not material things (although bath bombs and bedding features highly!), not things that we have to save up for, the things that surround us every day. Sunsets, camping, dog walking, a funny thing that happened at work, trying out a new recipe and people liking it!

And that’s the difference between my twenties and thirties – planning for future happiness and finding happiness in the here and now. It isn’t always easy because some days are dire but with some practise, I’ve taught myself that in every day there is something good and something that makes you smile – even if it is a chocolate digestive whilst watching Neighbours!

So, your task now is to think of something that has made your day happy, note it down and when you look back at the end of the week, month or year, you’ll find that all those small things add up to a not so gloomy picture.

Happy Tuesday.

#hairlesshannah

 

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Guest Post – Hayes Family

If we are talking about positives that go with alopecia, it’s meeting some of the most amazing people world wide via social media. The Hayes Family are some of those people.  Mum Ashley, Dad Zach and daughter Malia, come from America and make YouTube videos primarily to promote alopecia awareness because their beautiful daughter has alopecia. I have loved watching their videos (partly because they are also Disney super fans and that makes me happy) and admire the way they are so open and honest about how alopecia affects their family from a parents point of view and from a child’s perspective.

So, I reached out to them and asked if they’d like to guest blog about their experiences and they said yes! So here you go, a guest blog post from the amazing Hayes family. Please go follow them on their social media and subscribe to their YouTube channel:

YouTube: @hayesfamilyvlog Instagram: @hayesfamilyvlog

Our Beautiful Alopecia Princess

If we could only choose one word to describe our daughter it would be “incredible”. In November of 2016 our daughter Malia was officially diagnosed with Alopecia Areata. However, she has had it since she was a year and half old. 

It all began very slowly. At the age of 2 her hair had completely fallen out; her eyebrows were completely gone and then her eyelashes fell out. This gave us major concern as to our child’s health so as parents due, we took her to a dermatologist. They told us not to worry and that hair loss at Malia’s young age is normal but that it could be Alopecia. She suggested that we continue to watch her hair growth and that if it continued, to come back for another checkup. 

Within a year of this appointment Malia grew patches of black and white hair that would inevitably fall out. This cycle happened often. We would get stares and even be approached by strangers asking if Malia had cancer or how her chemotherapy was going. When we would tell them that she was not sick the next question was, well what’s wrong with her and sadly we did not have an answer. So right before Malia’s 4th birthday we scheduled a checkup appointment and behold she was diagnosed with Alopecia Areata. 
It’s funny how badly you want an answer to something and when you get it, it’s not what you want to hear. I’d be lying if I told you I was not sad and upset. I was and so was my husband. As her mother the first thing that went through my mind was, what did I do or not do properly while I was pregnant? I put so much blame on myself and cried for a week. We realized that being upset about it doesn’t change anything nor help the situation so we decided to face this head on and learn everything that we possibly could. And you know what? It helped! So we began to look for support groups and basically anyone else who has Alopecia that we could reach out to. 
As a family we watch a lot of YouTube. Fail videos, family vloggers, Disney vloggers, theme park vloggers and basically anything funny. So we decided to see if there was a family on YouTube who had a family member with Alopecia. The search came up with zero results. We found a lot of adults with Alopecia which is lovely but no children for Malia to relate to. So that day we decided that maybe we could help other families and children who have Alopecia by making fun family vlogs! We figured if we could inspire someone with Alopecia to live their life openly and freely then maybe we could make a difference in brining awareness and acceptance. And you know what, IT WORKED! We have been introduced to so many wonderful people with and without Alopecia who are not only kind but are wanting to help spread the awareness. 


In the end, as Malia’s parents we try our absolute best every single day to build the confidence she possesses. She is the most beautiful person inside and out, we could not be prouder.

Lonely.

The definition of lonely in the dictionary is: ‘sad because one has no friends or company.’

I agree that this is one way of looking at the word however, it isn’t always as simple as that. I am sure the feeling of loneliness has affected most of us at one point or another in our lives but thankfully, I am also sure that the majority of people reading this are lucky enough to have a whole host of friends and family of whom they can call upon in times of need.

I started to really think about the state of being lonely a few weeks back because I did indeed feel very lonely and isolated. I count myself extremely lucky because I do have the most amazing group of friends and I live with my amazing family so the dictionary definition doesn’t fit in with my sense of loneliness. So how is it then that I go through extreme stages of feeling like I am totally alone?

I have always been very good in my own company. I can occupy myself and keep busy most of the time without giving it a second thought. I pop on some music or a film and can potter about quite happily without a second thought that I am ‘on my own.’  I lived on my own in the UK and in Dubai without giving it a second thought. Yet, I also absolutely adore human interaction and good company. I love a good catch up, bit of gossip, a debate, laugh or simply to sit in silence with someone close to enjoy TV or a film. I know some people aren’t like this, they can’t stand being in their own company or at least not for very long and I also know those who choose smaller amounts of time with people as they prefer the quiet life. There is no right or wrong, as individuals we all suit different lifestyles and ways of filling our time.

However, my circumstances have led to a real upheaval of my normal routine and therefore I have had much more time on my hands to be by myself and I can’t do many of the things I would usually do with this time because of my illness. Therefore, I spend many hours feeling isolated, frustrated and trapped. Although I have never had one day by myself since coming home two years ago, I have discovered that it is totally reasonable to feel lonely even though you’re surrounded by people – a crazy concept I know!

This isn’t a ‘woe is me’ post, more a mind dump of thoughts I’ve been having of late and a way of reasoning with my feelings. One is of course the circumstance I find myself in compared to that I wish I wish in. I don’t have a partner, I am a single pringle who is in no position to contemplate or entertain the idea of dating or finding someone. Therefore, that results in not having that one person to lean on, confide in, share with and look after. I love a cuddle but I can, at times, go days without any human contact physically. That is sometimes my own doing because I know if I am touched I will crumble and I don’t always want that!  Of course I have the emotional support from my family on a daily basis, but ultimately, when I go upstairs and close that door, I am alone. Just me. Just me and my thoughts. And although sometimes this is all I want, it’s where I can just focus on what I need, it can also be a danger zone because being alone can become quite a dark place at times.

During the last month I have made a choice of being alone most of the time. I haven’t been in a good head space and haven’t wanted interaction and when I have, I’ve found that the smallest of things will irritate or upset me. I’ve just wanted peace and quiet, low lighting and comfy surroundings to ease the symptoms that have become so acute. This is most definitely a double-edged sword because although it’s what I have wanted, it hasn’t necessarily helped. Being around people and socialising, although exhausting, lifts my mood and occupies me. I’ve noticeably not reached out to people for company like I normally would and I am now consciously making more of an effort because I know that friendships are two-way and I can’y always rely on others to organise, I need to meet them half way. That’s where CBT is helping because I can pace myself in terms of self-care and preservation alongside seeing people and doing nice things to keep me going.

Lonely is a tough place to be. You can’t always see a way out of it but there are always options – texts, phone calls, Skype, arranging catch ups or simply making links within communities on social media with people who understand what you’re experiencing. This is one that I find most helpful at times because one cause of my loneliness is the feeling that people don’t truly understand and ‘get’ what I’m going through on a daily basis. It’s through no fault of anyone, life has to go on, but at the moment I simply can’t shake this overwhelming sense of feeling trapped by my mind and body. For the first time in months I gave up the other day. I uttered the words, “I can’t.” I’d gone with mum and dad for a little walk at High Elms, it wasn’t sunny so my pins and needles shouldn’t have been too much of an issue – but storm Brian had other ideas and set about sending strong gusts of wind. The only way I can describe it was that the pins and needles were lodged in my face and head, and every time the wind blew against me, it pushed those bloody things in and out of face and head like they were drilling tiny holes. It was so painful and for once, I couldn’t ignore them, so I went back and took shelter in the car. I didn’t cry, I didn’t get upset, I just felt anger. Like so many times at the moment, I wanted to scream, to shout and to vent the frustration that courses through my body several times a day. I hate this life, I hate my body and I hate that at the moment, my mind won’t let me push these thoughts away.

ME is a lonely illness, it is isolating, it is frustrating and it is a place where you spend a lot of time alone. I’m okay with that most of the time, I’m becoming more accepting of it because really, there’s no other way I can be because there is no fix for it. I don’t always want to talk about how I feel or what I’m thinking, I don’t want to discuss the pain or frustration but that equals an even more lonely feeling because I can’t share it with anyone, I only burden myself and that is tough. I just have to remind myself that although I spend much of my time by myself or with the same four people I share a house with, I am not alone.  I will never be alone and I should be grateful for that. There is always someone who will listen, whether that be someone you know or a stranger you can connect with. We must take advantage of the positives that living in this social media driven world provides us with and I can’t recommend it enough.

So, please, if you’re feeling lonely today, reach out, talk, share and know, you are not alone in whatever you are going through so don’t be afraid to talk.

Be kind to yourself.

Happy Tuesday,

#hairlesshannah

 

 

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Autumn leaves are brown

Bald blogger, Hairless Hannah

So I’ve just had a Peter Kay moment…I always thought the first line of ‘California Dreamin’ ‘ by The Mamas and Papas was “Autumn leaves are brown.” Turns out it’s, “All the leaves are brown.” Gutted. It was the perfect title for this blog but as you can see, I still went ahead and used it anyway!

You will probably notice that from now on my blog might not always relate to my ailments. I will of course use the blog to update as and when I feel I want to write about it but I also need to explore other avenues for my writing. I just hope you continue to read and enjoy the content; nearly a year on and I have had over 10,000 views which is an achievement I am thoroughly proud of so thank you for taking time to read about my life!

Autumn is here…

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Me, ME & CBT

On September 21st, we were made aware that Radio 4 would be doing a phone in all about ME/CFS. So, mum, dad and I sat in the kitchen and listened in and I have to say, my reaction was not necessarily what I was expecting.

I assumed that the show was probably picking up on the fact that there has been quite a bit of press attention towards ME/CFS recently because NICE have ordered a review of the “treatments” available. Because of research I have done, I was aware that there are many people who suffer with ME, around 200,00 in the UK and there are only two therapies recommended by the NHS- GET (graded exercise therapy) and CBT (cognitive behaviour therapy.)

The phone in involved many people contacting Radio 4 and giving their experiences of ME and talking about the support and treatments they have tried or been recommended. And that’s where I was astounded, the sheer quantity of people they had contacted them was overwhelming and each person they spoke to or read out an e-mail from was so devastatingly sad, hopeless and in many ways negative. Yes, in some ways I found it encouraging that it’s not just me that has experienced the lack of knowledge around the illness from health professionals, that treatment options are sparse and that language used towards us is often belittling and derogatory. That I am not the only one suffering the way I do on a daily basis and feeling like they’re getting nowhere.

But what I found most frustrating was the views they put across about GET and CBT. Now, I am not a specialist on this and would never claim to be. Everyone’s experiences will differ and depending on the outcomes of said treatments, people will have different opinions on their worth. I am well aware there is no “cure,” and I know that there are many differing levels of suffering with ME and that I am by no means at the severe end of the scale. But that’s what’s tough, my level of suffering is bad enough so to imagine it being worse is unthinkable.

I won’t be commenting on GET as I haven’t any experience of it but as you may know if you have read my previous blogs, I have been given a course of CBT on the NHS. Even though I had heard some negative connotations around it, I really am a – ‘anything is worth a try’ kinda gal so purposefully didn’t do too much research as I wanted to go in with an open mind.  Therefore to listen to so many people’s stories of how it hasn’t worked for them, made them worse etc made me fearful for those who have been offered CBT and haven’t yet started.

I am ten sessions in and am still totally undecided on how I feel about it. It’s hard. It’s emotional and in some ways I have had to take steps backwards BUT I can see the reason why it is suggested as something to support ME sufferers. It has not made me better but it has helped me to “cope” a little more and supported me in terms of learning how to pace myself properly – before was all guess-work and I didn’t know what was best. I am lucky that I immediately hit it off with my therapist. I like her but more importantly, I trust her. She hasn’t once fed me the optimistic bs that so many doctors and specialists have over the past two years, she hasn’t guestimated how long it may take to make improvements and she hasn’t once made me feel stupid or that it’s all in my head.

My mind is still divided and in some ways uncertain as to some of the things we do – sometimes I think if I have to fill in one more bloody diary sheet I might scream!! I am not for one minute saying no one should be negative about CBT because believe me, I’ve had my moments. It isn’t a cure but you know what, if it’s the only thing that can be offered to me then I’d be silly to not give it my all and put my trust in her.

I spent the entirety of my last session talking to her about the Radio 4 programme. She hadn’t heard it but was interested in my thoughts and feelings. I admitted it had made me doubt the CBT process and feel terribly upset and worried that if it doesn’t help me, there aren’t any other options and it had made me feel hopeless. I also expressed my deep sadness for those about to start CBT or those who are only a few sessions in who may have tuned into the programme. At that stage you are so vulnerable and it could totally tip you over into the frame of mind to approach CBT negatively from the start and that surely leaves you in a worse off position than going in open-minded?

I explained how I worried that our sessions were very much based around unhelpful thinking patterns and that although I understood that helps my mental state, ME isn’t a psychological illness, it isn’t in my mind and that made me sad to think that is how I was potentially being viewed – as nuts. Or as it was expressed on the show, an over emotional female who can’t cope!

My therapist then took time to explain how she 100% knew that ME was not a psychological illness. How she’d worked with people who were bed bound, had seen the pain and other obstacles that her patients have to deal with first hand and that she would never want me to think that she thought of me as mad!  Once again she reiterated that she could make no promises with my recovery but that everything we do is with the aim to improve upon the way I live my life day-to-day right now. And that may be simply by increasing my daily activity by five minutes and she would be excited by that. Then we discusses my brain – a scary thing I can tell you! There is so much in the press about mental health which is so brilliant and she explained that although ME most certainly is a physical illness, the psychological fall out is just as real. The impact that ME has on your life is beyond explaining, I still struggle to fully explain the pain and frustration that lies behind my smile and the tears that are always ready to pour – to most it either looks like I’m fine or on the flip side that I’m in a mood (sometimes that’s true but mostly I cope by either smiling or being quiet because words just aren’t enough.)

I am slowly learning that my brain is just as in need of treatment as any other part of my body. If my arm broke, I’d get a cast, if my eye sight starts to go, I’d get glasses, if I hurt my back, I’d get physio. So when my mind is put under stress and strain, why shouldn’t I seek help through therapy? And there in lies the beauty of CBT. I can talk to someone who knows ME like the back of her hand, I’m not saying they all do, but luckily, my therapist is first class. She understands my symptoms and she helps me, asks me what I want to talk about, what I want to aim for, what my ultimate hope is for my illness and the treatment and slowly, gradually we work together to try to aim for that.

We make and monitor targets. I needed to know if and when I should push myself. I have totally reverted to being a teenager again and feel terrible guilt if I don’t achieve my targets or have to turn up saying, “Sorry, I didn’t do my diaries this week because, well, I wasn’t in the right frame of mind.” It’s awful, I feel like I’m going to get detention! But that’s something to work on because as you may have guessed, she doesn’t get mad, she doesn’t berate me. She tells me I know my body and mind the best. I know when I can push myself to achieve those targets we set, there is no point adjusting them or pushing for them if they will make it harder than it already is on a daily basis. Now that doesn’t mean she doesn’t push me to some extent but she pushes me within or jsut slightly beyond my limits and always does so with care and consideration. She is always at the end of an e-mail and replies quick as a flash and has supported me in so many other ways outside of the therapy room, in ways no one else has done before. I tell you, this woman really is top class.

It’s hard to see any progress, it’s like looking for a needle in a haystack sometimes and I know I get blindsided by time and milestones i.e. it’s nearly two years since I’ve been home and I feel just as stuck and possibly even sadder than I did back then. But at the end of the last session, she sensed that the Radio 4 programme had popped a seed of doubt into my mind so we got out my targets and charts from when I first met with her.

Over ten sessions (24 weeks) I have upped my daily activity by 20 minutes, this doesn’t seem by much but when most of the activities I do link to crafts – using scissors and using my hands, well, that hurts quite considerably so, yeah – 20 minutes is a lot!  I have reduced my daily sleep allowance to 2 hours (not achieved on many days, but on more than not) and when I achieve my ‘get out of the house daily’ (not met on 6/7 days this week, hangs head in shame) I can walk for 15 minutes without needing to stop or get home. I have also started to drive once a week, 5 minutes down the road to get to my reflexology sessions which is the biggest thing for me because I feel like that gives me some independence. I find it daunting and scary because I haven’t driven for so long and I am very aware of my capabilities or lack of them!

So, in actual fact, I have made progress. Yes, I may have achieved these without CBT but I reckon, for me, it would have taken a lot longer because I wouldn’t have known the best way, the safest way, the way which would help me most.

As I said at the beginning, this is my own personal experience and I know not everyone will be as lucky as me to have a therapist so experienced and so wonderful. But I guess what I’m trying to say is, if you haven’t started CBT yet or are nervous to, try not to be. Everyone’s experiences are different. It’s important to be honest, yes, and it’s brilliant to take advantage of that online community because you get so much support through it and learn a lot, however, as we know all too well, online communities can also have a flip side. It’s a safe place to moan and vent, I’ve done it! But that doesn’t mean it should cloud your experience. In the week between listening to the show and seeing my therapist I spent a lot of time online looking into others experiences with CBT and honestly, I only found one or two positive ones. I then felt bad, guilty almost that in some ways I am finding comfort from it. I’m not stupid, I know it won’t cure me, but I am realistic in that it helps me and I’m okay with that, it’s the closest I’ve got so far with any kind of proper help.

So accept those NHS sessions if you’re lucky enough, like me, to be offered them. And if like me, you weren’t aware that you could get access to sessions on the NHS, ask about them, request them, because who knows, you might actually find some benefit from it like I have. I certainly hope so anyway. This blog all began because I wanted share my experiences with alopeica but I think it is so important to share the good alongside the bad. Sharing positive experiences is so important, so please, if you’ve had a positive experience of CBT, let me know, comment below or send me a message, I’d love to hear about it.

Have a good Friday and a lovely weekend,

#hairlesshannah

My spoonie survival kit!

One of the questions I am often asked is what things help me on a day-to-day basis, things that ease the symptoms of ME. Obviously this will differ from person to person but I thought some might find it interesting or helpful to see what helps me, so here is my ultimate list for my spoonie survival kit!

What I always carry in my bag

I have never been one to pack light, even in my days pre ME! In the sixth form I was awarded the medal for being ‘mummy’ as I could pretty much always provide what anyone needed, from a tissue to a paracetamol, polo to a nail file! You will very rarely see me with a small bag as it just simply wouldn’t cut the mustard (where does that saying come from?!) in order to accommodate my needs!

  1. My polarised sunglasses. These were an expensive purchase when I lived in Dubai but my goodness have they been a life saver since being diagnosed. My light sensitivity is really bad and the difference between wearing normal sunglasses and my polarised ones has been incredible.
  2. Ear plugs. As I’ve mentioned before, noise sensitivity has also remained a real issue for me. As soon as I go somewhere that is more crowded I need these bad boys to keep my head from exploding. At home we can monitor and adjust the noise level but that’s not so easy if I venture out for a meal or to walk around a shop!
  3. Polos and rescue remedy. These two have featured in my bag essentials for a while now. Since suffering with panic attacks, these two things are my go to life lines. Bach’s rescue remedy I find really calming and helpful and as for polos, I’m not overly sure apart from a previous CBT therapist explained it may be because I can focus on a different sense which distracts me from my anxiety – who knows, all I’m bothered about is that they help when my anxiety rises!
  4. My little medication purse. One of my anxieties is that I could be somewhere and not have the thing I need to make me feel better so I have a medication bag! The essentials are: travel sickness pills, Imodium, paracetamol, Paramol, anti-histamine, inhaler, antiseptic hand gel, hand cream and throat sweets.
  5. Bottle of water. One of the side effects of some of the drugs I’m on is a very dry mouth but also, water is always good incase I need to take tablets or have a hot flush!
  6. Eye drops. Since losing my eyelashes I’ve noticed that my eyes are more susceptible to getting dry, itchy and getting dust etc in them. Eye drops are just a useful things to have at hand for those irritating moments.

 

At home survival essentials

  1. Electric blanket. Honestly, this bad boy is slowly becoming my new best friend! I haven’t had it on during the Summer but popped it back on my bed about three weeks ago and oh my, I had forgotten the benefits it provides. The difference in my restless and painful legs is definitely aided by this hot piece of material and I have found that the sleep I do manage to get seems to be of a better quality.
  2. My pregnancy pillow! Again, it provides me and my painful limbs with the much-needed support they crave. I am so much more comfortable lying down with this wrapped around me – who needs a man eh?!
  3. My diary. I’ve kept a diary every day since I was 11 but it really has been an essential for me as it’s a way of venting every day and getting my emotions out. I still find talking tough so this is my way of getting my thoughts and feelings out of my system before I go to sleep. Again, this helps me to go to bed with all those heavy thoughts weighing me down.
  4. Bath range! I love me a bath! Any Lush bath bomb will suffice but I absolutely adore the Marks and Spencers Sleep range. A friend got me them for my birthday – all lavender based, not overpowering, just right. A shower gel, foot cream, hand cream, body lotion and pillow spray, all amazing products although I am also partial to the Lush cream called Sleepy. There’s been a lot of press around lately about how it’s a miracle cure for insomnia…it hasn’t done that for me at all but I do love the smell and it definitely is a calming scent.
  5. Dimmer lights and subtitles! Yep, I am a granny…these link to light and noise sensitivity but there are always options to make life bearable.

 

So there you have it, my list of goodies that I use everyday to help me – if you have any to add to it, please comment and let me know.

Hope you’re having a lovely week,

#hairlesshannah

Introducing Sunshine Makes & Bakes

I am very excited to finally be able to let you in on something I’ve been working on! If this is your first time reading my blog, let me fill you in on my story so far.

My name is Hannah, 31 years old and I have both ME/CFS and alopecia. I was living and working in Dubai as a primary teacher when I became ill and had to fly home. I have moved back in with my parents and for two years have been totally dependant on them financially, emotionally and physically. Alopecia has robbed me of my hair, eyebrows and eyelashes and ME has robbed me of my independence, confidence as well as many other aspects of my life.

Before becoming ill I had no idea about the ‘spoonie’ community however, now I would class myself as a fully fledged spoonie. So let me explain; a spoonie is someone with a chronic illness. You start the day with a certain amount of spoons and as your day progresses and you do activities, you use up your spoons until you have none left or are in negative numbers! Spoons are often not refundable by sleep, sleep is often unrefreshing so pacing becomes the best option which is a hard lesson to learn.

spoon-theory

One of the things I have found the toughest is my lack of independence and relying on my parents to support me financially. So, a few months ago a little idea came to mind – maybe I could use my spoons to my advantage and set up a little business that I could control. I love to bake and I love to be creative and one of my sayings since getting ill has been, make your own sunshine. And so that is when Sunshine Makes and Bakes was born.

sunshine m and bs

Behind the scenes I have slowly, at my own pace, set up a little studio at home and begun to make crafts and bake cakes to sell and so far it’s been a revelation. It’s given me back some independence and given me a purpose again. I am in control so if I don’t have enough spoons, I don’t have to make or bake that day and if I am having an okay day, I can spend fifteen minutes, half an hour or even an hour working on my products. There’s no pressure of letting people down, it’s like a hobby that I control.

A website has now been created and I am ready to go live! I will be posting UK wide but if you’d rather collect and avoid postage fees that fine too. Obviously for cake orders it will be collection only. To ensure I am pacing myself I ask for 10 days notice on orders so I can ensure my health remains the priority. I am SO excited to share my wares with you and hope you might like what you see enough to make a little order!

There are many different items available – greetings cards, photographic cards using my own photos, framed and unframed button and scrabble art, magnets, magnetic pegs, Christmas card sets and gift tags and a wide range of baked, scrummy goods! I am happy to personalise orders – crafts and bakes –  and to talk through ideas you may have about products to ensure you get the most sunshine from every order you place. As they say – if you don’t ask you will never know!

You will notice that there isn’t a shopping cart on the website, all orders need to be placed via the contact page. Just let me know what it is you’ve seen that you’d like or something you like that you’d like to personalise and I will then send you an invoice before getting to work on your purchase. The website is best viewed on an iPhone or from your computer, it isn’t fully compatible with iPads yet.

 

So, here’s the link, go get some sunshine in your life!

http://www.sunshinemakesandbakes.co.uk

I am also on social media:

Twitter: @sunshinemandbs

Instagram: @sunshinemakesandbakes

Facebook: @sunshinemakesandbakes

So get following, get liking, get sharing and possibly even get ordering!  Spreading awareness about chronic illness is so important for me and anything you can do to help with this is always much appreciated.

But finally and most importantly, thank you so much for your continued support and well wishes, it keeps me going from day-to-day.

#hairlesshannah